This is my story  

On this page, we feature stories of different people who have experienced mental health issues in different forms. It may be from a person suffering from a mental health illness, a carer or support worker, a member of the family or friend, or it could be a professional. The aim is for people to tell their stories from their point of view and how their experiences have impacted on their lives. We believe that sharing stories with others can be both empowering for the individual sharing as well as inducing an affinity with others who may be going through the same experiences, but feel isolated and alone. Hearing others share about similar experiences can prove to be an empowering experience for them, too. 
 
If you would like to have your story featured on this page, please email it to us to communications@breakforth.co.uk. We may edit your submission and will let you know if we do this and make sure that you are happy with the edit before we publish it. Please note that we are unable to publish all the stories we get due to the high volume, but we will endeavour to respond, by email, to every story submitted. 

This is my story  

On this page, we feature stories of different people who have experienced mental health issues in different forms. It may be from a person suffering from a mental health illness, a carer or support worker, a member of the family or friend, or it could be a professional. The aim is for people to tell their stories from their point of view and how their experiences have impacted on their lives. 
 
If you would like to have your story featured on this page, please email it to us to communications@breakforth.co.uk. We may edit your submission and will let you know if we do this and make sure that you are happy with the edit before we publish it. Please note that we are unable to publish all the stories we get due to the high volume, but we will endeavour to respond, by email, to every story submitted. 
I remember a time, much to my current regret, where I was quite sceptical to the legitimacy of widespread mental health. I would always think: "Surely if they tried like the rest of us, they could come out of this fruitless depression," "how can paranoia/delusions truly exist, do they not understand how foolish these ridiculous conceptions are," "why do these people allow their anxieties to take over," and most shamefully "why can't they just take control of themselves?" 
“Sometimes you can just feel mediocre about your child. It doesn’t mean that you don’t love them, it’s just that you’re ill. You should recognise that you’re not a monster.” 
 
Postnatal depression affects more than one in every ten women after pregnancy, making it a common problem. The effects of the illness can start at any time within the first year after giving birth. It can also affect men as well. It is considered normal to feel anxious or down after pregnancy; this is commonly referred to as the “baby blues” and should last no more than two weeks. However, if the sad and tearful feelings continue after two weeks, it is often recognised as postnatal depression.