This is my story  

On this page, we feature stories of different people who have experienced mental health issues in different forms. It may be from a person suffering from a mental health illness, a carer or support worker, a member of the family or friend, or it could be a professional. The aim is for people to tell their stories from their point of view and how their experiences have impacted on their lives. We believe that sharing stories with others can be both empowering for the individual sharing as well as inducing an affinity with others who may be going through the same experiences, but feel isolated and alone. Hearing others share about similar experiences can prove to be an empowering experience for them, too. 
 
If you would like to have your story featured on this page, please email it to us to communications@breakforth.co.uk. We may edit your submission and will let you know if we do this and make sure that you are happy with the edit before we publish it. Please note that we are unable to publish all the stories we get due to the high volume, but we will endeavour to respond, by email, to every story submitted. 

This is my story  

On this page, we feature stories of different people who have experienced mental health issues in different forms. It may be from a person suffering from a mental health illness, a carer or support worker, a member of the family or friend, or it could be a professional. The aim is for people to tell their stories from their point of view and how their experiences have impacted on their lives. 
 
If you would like to have your story featured on this page, please email it to us to communications@breakforth.co.uk. We may edit your submission and will let you know if we do this and make sure that you are happy with the edit before we publish it. Please note that we are unable to publish all the stories we get due to the high volume, but we will endeavour to respond, by email, to every story submitted. 

Posts tagged “pride”

Walking through Oxford Street, the space was flooded with colour. Red, orange, yellow, green, blue and purple covered the grey walls and buildings. A procession of flamboyant vehicles jived through the streets, booming out vibrant songs and encouraging the crowd to dance. It is undeniable that the energy on that day was full of nothing but positivity, happiness, and of course buckets of Pride. However, beneath the surface, there is a blackness. And when the crowds disperse and the people return home, the LGBTIQA+ community go on battling oppression, hate and mental health problems. This is not to say all of them go through this, but the figures show that LGBTIQA+ people are three times more likely to suffer depression, twice as likely to experience suicidal thoughts or make suicide attempts, and seven times more likely to take drugs, compared with their heterosexual counterparts. 
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